Monthly Archives: April 2019

From the Range

with Caleb Wallace

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After the last day of deer season the majority of hunters clean their rifle and put it in the safe until next season. While there’s plenty of outdoor activity to keep you busy during spring, (fishing, chasing turkeys, hog hunting, etc.) It’s also a great time to sharpen up on your marks man skills. I hear people all the time talking about killing a deer at 300+ yards. While this can be achieved, it’s not an easy task. What I like to do in the spring is put myself in a hunting scenario. What do I mean by “Hunting Scenario”? If you mainly hunt from a box blind, put a blind chair with a rest the same height as your window on your range. If you spot and stalk, think about the different positions you usually shoot from and simulate them. If you have a range buddy, have him put up your targets and you put up his. Why do this you ask? Because you are trying to simulate a hunting situation and you never know where that big buck is going to show his face. There are a few different types of targets I use for this. Because a deer has about a 9” kill zone, a round steel target of the same size is a great choice. Also, Birchwood Casey makes a deer paper target that shows the vitals and is great for practicing.
Now that your targets are set and you’ve assumed your shooting position, it’s time to burn some gun powder. Do you think previous bucks that were harvested walked up to the feeder and patiently waited until the hunter decided to make the shot? Heck NO! Once the deer steps out, you have about 10 seconds to range him and get in position to make a clean kill. Because this is the typical situation with mature trophy bucks, I like to set a 10 second timer. Once time starts, range your target, make the needed adjustments depending on range, and squeeze that trigger. I’ve found it very effective to practice these range drills about twice a month (I wish I had time for more) during the off season. Have some fun with it too. Maybe you and a few hunting buddies bet a steak dinner on who shoots the best. Get that rifle out of the safe, and go send some lead down range!

From the Hunting Camp

with Richard Albritton 

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Hunting season is over, the Crappie have moved into the shallow water in preparation for the spawn. Now it’s once again time to start thinking about the upcoming deer season. Bucks have started their antler growth, the does are carrying their fawns, and both could use a little boost in supplemental feed and minerals to better their health and increase antler growth.
This spring has been one wettest in recent memory.  Because of this, browse is readily available and at a maximum.  They have plenty to eat…we’re just giving them a little extra.
Implementing mineral and supplemental feeding programs by creating mineral licks, or feed stations, will boost antler growth and help those does make it through a time that is extremely taxing.
There are several mineral make-ups: solid block, granular, and liquid. “Trophy Rocks” is a great choice as a mineral supplement. I recommend and sell loads of these each year.  It’s not a manufactured lick like most, it’s a mined rock so it’s as natural as it gets. Whitetail Institute makes a granulated mineral, 30-06 Thrive, which is a great mixture with loads of nutritional value. And finally, Big and J. produces both a liquid and granular mix. The aroma of these products is far reaching with loads of nutritional value.
Look, you’re in the woods turkey hunting anyway so go ahead, get your supplemental mineral and feeding programs started!  Set your favorite trail camera out, and start getting the first pictures of the year and take inventory of your herd well before you climb in your stand this fall.
Happy hunting and come see us at Simmons!

 

Simmons’ Turkey Report with Jeff Simmons:

There always seems to be some challenge with hunting turkeys. This season, not only do hunters have to find birds and lure them in, but many hunters are being forced to change tactics and locations due to all this rain. It’s been a mixed bag.

 

The rain has messed up bottomland hunting and left many prime hunting areas under a load of water. Turkeys will often answer calls, but they don’t like to fly over water when they don’t have to. Take that in consideration if flood waters have separated you and your gobblers.

 

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On the other hand, that has concentrated the birds in the hill country, which also makes them a little easier to locate for hunters in that habitat. But when all these changes take over, it does make the birds even more wary than before.

 

We’ve heard reports that the gobblers are acting a little strange in some places. They answer calls, but are slow to come to them. In other areas, the gobblers are still with the hens, making it difficult to get them separated. But that’s what makes this so much fun — when it isn’t frustrating. It is a challenge.

 

In either case, be safe out there.

Simmons’ Turkey Report with Jeff Simmons:

We’ve had a good start to the turkey season. I got to hunt over in Mississippi and had good luck.

The kids and I spent a few days over in Texas. Hunter got his limit of four and Lindsey and I both got two. We should have limited out but we had a couple of slip ups.

Gobblers are gobbling good in most places. Some are still with hens which makes it tough.

At home, it’s been a mixed bag. Even with all the rain, a lot of turkeys are being killed and they seem active. There are a few hard luck stories but that is why they call it hunting!

Overall it’s a good start. We will keep you posted on what we are hearing.

Be safe out there.

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Simmons Turkey Report with Jeff Simmons:

Turkey season opens Saturday. Where are you going?
See if your favorite spot is one of the best places to hunt turkeys in north Louisiana? Things may change a bit this year, but if history holds, here are some good bets:

According to data from the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries, the map below shows the number of reported turkey kills for 2018 in each parish. As you can see, Claiborne led area parishes with 215 reported kills followed by Union with 139, Winn with 95 and Lincoln with 84.

Check out your parish

 

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